Sponsored post: Cask wine gets a makeover

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Let’s be honest, when I was at university cask wine was known as “goon” and I drank it to get drunk cheaply. But, now I’m all grown up cask wine has grown up as well.  The new cask wine is perfect for gourmet chicks like me because some of the best wineries in Australia are serving their wines up in casks: think Amberley Kiss and Tell Still Moscato , Winesmiths Sauvignon Blanc and De Bortoli Premium Reserve Shiraz. There’s no sacrifice on quality just for the packaging.

DSC07832For the environmental chicks out there you get to feel even more virtuous drinking cask wine because it’s got a lower environmental footprint than glass. For thrifty chicks – cask wine is the perfect thing to drink when you just want to have one glass rather than opening a whole bottle. Perfect for that just-got-home-from-work-and-dying-for-a-glass-of-wine Wednesday night, cheeky-glass-of-wine-at-home-before-hitting-the-town Friday night and bath-book-wine-and-early-to-bed Sunday night. Plus if you’re feeling patriotic think of what a brilliant Aussie innovation cask wine is.

So here’s how to pair your cask wine with food:

Fig1. The Winesmiths Sauvignon Blanc with roasted sweet potato, fig and goats cheese salad.

This herby tropical Savvy B is crisp and clean so it pairs well with high acid fresh foods like this Ottolenghi roasted sweet potato, fresh fig and goats cheese salad.

IMG_39642. Amberley Kiss & Tell Still Moscato with French toast and balsamic strawberries.

Pour a glass of this and transport yourself straight to a Summer evening. Kiss & Tell still moscato is sweet but subtle and won’t overshadow a brunch of French toast with balsamic strawberries.

DSC078273. DeBortoli Premium Reserve Shiraz with pork and fennel meatballs.

I’m a big fan of DeBortoli wines and this shiraz delivers a great flavour punch that stands up really well to comfort food like these pork and fennel meatballs.

Here’s how you make them:

Pork and fennel meat balls
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2672 calories
292 g
425 g
58 g
199 g
19 g
1438 g
1230 g
28 g
0 g
30 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
1438g
Amount Per Serving
Calories 2672
Calories from Fat 516
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 58g
89%
Saturated Fat 19g
94%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 7g
Monounsaturated Fat 23g
Cholesterol 425mg
142%
Sodium 1230mg
51%
Total Carbohydrates 292g
97%
Dietary Fiber 20g
81%
Sugars 28g
Protein 199g
Vitamin A
53%
Vitamin C
92%
Calcium
49%
Iron
92%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 2 tsp fennel seeds
  2. 100g breadcrumbs
  3. 1 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped
  4. 500g pork mince
  5. Salt and pepper to season
  6. 250g spaghetti
  7. 1 red onion, diced
  8. 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  9. 2 tins tomatoes, diced
  10. 200ml white wine
  11. 1 tbsp tomato paste
Instructions
  1. 1. Preheat the oven to 200c.
  2. 2. Heat a frying pan and lightly toast the fennel seeds and then crush them in a mortar and pestle. Toasting the seeds helps release the flavour.
  3. 3. Mix the fennel seeds, breadcrumbs, parsley, pork and salt and pepper together and roll into walnut size balls.
  4. 4. Heat olive oil in pan over a medium heat and cook the meatballs for two minutes on each side until browned. Then place on a tray and bake into the oven for a further 8 minutes or until cooked through.
  5. 5. Meanwhile bring a large pot of water to the boil and add the spaghetti. Cook for 10 minutes or until al dente.
  6. 6. Add the onion and garlic and cook over a low heat for five minutes until the onions soften. Stir in the tomatoes, tomato paste and wine and cook for 15 minutes. At the last minute add the spinach and stir through until wilted and then add the meatballs to the sauce. Season to taste.
  7. 7. Serve the spaghetti topped with the meatballs and sauce.
beta
calories
2672
fat
58g
protein
199g
carbs
292g
more
Gourmet Chick http://www.gourmet-chick.com/
DSC07837Find out what other good stuff is out there at www.askforcask.com.au or check them out on Facebook. This is a sponsored post created to celebrate 50 years of cask wine in Australia.

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